Cats are smarter than dogs!!!

Cats are smarter than dogs!!!
transfinite
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 8:26 AM:
Subject: Cats are smarter than dogs!!!
I've had both cats and dogs as pets. I assumed that dogs were smarter than cats because they are so friendly, sociable and learn tricks. I thought of cats as like dogs with Asperger's syndrome. Therefore, I was surprised to learn that cats have twice as many brain cells (neurons) than dogs, i.e., cats have 300 million neurons in their cortex (the thinking part) compared to 160 million for dogs. I was puzzled about this until I realized that cats as solo animals have more survival challenges than dogs who live in packs and have less pressure to survive. Feral cats are on their own in the wild and don't have other cats to help them hunt and provide some degree of protection. Its kind of like people. We don't need as many brain cells living in a group than if we lived alone.

P.S. In evaluations of the problem solving abilities of dogs, border collies are the highest and grayhounds and the lowest.
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 8:39 AM:

Not true www.psychologytoday.com/blo...dogs-more-intelligent-cats
transfinite
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 8:49 AM:

It's the encephalitic Index (ratio of brain weight to body weight) rather than brain size that is a true measure of intelligence. For example, elephants have bigger brains than humans but this doesn't mean they are smarter.
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 9:01 AM:

transfinite wrote:
It's the encephalitic Index (ratio of brain weight to body weight) rather than brain size that is a true measure of intelligence. For example, elephants have bigger brains than humans but this doesn't mean they are smarter.

The encephalization index is exactly what that article (that Wisebbq linked to) is about. According to that article, not only are dogs higher on the scale than cats, but the gap is widening owing to the different ways we relate to them.
On Aug 10, 2012 - 1:36 AM, Benkei responded: Noooooooo! Cats are so much cooler than dogs! Why God? Why?!
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 9:50 AM:

I read that both cats and dogs (the pet variety) have smaller brains than their closest wild species relatives. Not sure what that would be for cats, but obviously wolves for dogs. For dogs: huskies, retrievers, and shepherds seem to be the smartest, and greyhounds and afghans the most stupid.

Cats were just not domesticated the same way dogs were. Cats revert to feral behavior in short order. So do horses and pigs, if there is a suitable environment. Dogs, however, belong to us. We're stuck with each other.

A smart dog is a smart animal, but most dogs have a couple of abilities that other animals don't have: They follow our gaze. That is a tremendously useful evolutionary adaptation for the dog: It enables them to be more successfully social members. Dogs also kept the cooperative pack behaviors of the wolf, which is also very useful to them, and us. Some dogs can also learn a substantial number of commands and word associations, and interpret gestures quite well. Most dogs can tell the difference between us getting ready to go to work and getting ready to to go for a walk, even if the two involve some of the same behaviors on our part.

Cat behavior just isn't organized this way. Cats are more solitary, they hunt by stalking (big cat style), and they are small enough to succeed. A retriever would have a hard time sneaking up on a pigeon if its life depended on it, and the payoff wouldn't be very satisfying. Wolves resort to catching mice under the snow if nothing else is available, but it's hard for the wolves to catch enough of them.

My retrievers were smart in many ways, but either they willfully refused to learn any tricks or I didn't know how to teach them. (But they displayed intelligence all over the place in various annoying, manipulative ways. Like selective deafness.)
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 10:03 AM:

If it's true that the ancient Egyptians worshipped cats as gods, they were wise to do so. I think the deity is more like a cat than a human. The Divine Cat have mercy on us.
mayor of simpleton
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 10:35 AM:

Dogs have an owner.
Cats have personnel.

Any questions?

Meow!

Greg
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 11:22 AM:

I have both a Siamese Cat and a Chit Tzu dog. They are of the same size and age and they play together. As a rule the cat always outsmart the dog, that have to be "saved" from some biped around them. Who is the smartest of them then? It depends entirely on the context I would say, but usually the cat, he even know how to open the door to the refrigerator, the dog hasn't learned that trick yet...
On Aug 9, 2012 - 11:27 AM, mayor of simpleton responded: Chit tzu always sounds like what the owner has to scrape off the sidewalk and put into a plastic bag
On Aug 9, 2012 - 12:11 PM, Mr. Gorbag responded: Eh, Chih Tzu to be fair to the dog. He is a better "guardian" than the cat though...
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 12:03 PM:

My mother in law's dog used to chase my cat and terrorize it, then one day, for reasons that aren't clear, the cat turned around and swatted the dog about 20 times in about 1/2 second. Now every time that dog comes over, the cat crouches down and leaps on top of the dog and tears into it. It's the most brutal and entertaining thing you've ever seen. The dog cowers as the cat digs into her back until we take the cat away.

I can therefore say that cats fully understand the concept of payback.
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Posted Aug 9, 2012 - 12:10 PM:

BitterCrank wrote:
I read that both cats and dogs (the pet variety) have smaller brains than their closest wild species relatives. Not sure what that would be for cats, but obviously wolves for dogs. For dogs: huskies, retrievers, and shepherds seem to be the smartest, and greyhounds and afghans the most stupid.

Cats were just not domesticated the same way dogs were. Cats revert to feral behavior in short order. So do horses and pigs, if there is a suitable environment. Dogs, however, belong to us. We're stuck with each other.

A smart dog is a smart animal, but most dogs have a couple of abilities that other animals don't have: They follow our gaze. That is a tremendously useful evolutionary adaptation for the dog: It enables them to be more successfully social members. Dogs also kept the cooperative pack behaviors of the wolf, which is also very useful to them, and us. Some dogs can also learn a substantial number of commands and word associations, and interpret gestures quite well. Most dogs can tell the difference between us getting ready to go to work and getting ready to to go for a walk, even if the two involve some of the same behaviors on our part.

Cat behavior just isn't organized this way. Cats are more solitary, they hunt by stalking (big cat style), and they are small enough to succeed. A retriever would have a hard time sneaking up on a pigeon if its life depended on it, and the payoff wouldn't be very satisfying. Wolves resort to catching mice under the snow if nothing else is available, but it's hard for the wolves to catch enough of them.

My retrievers were smart in many ways, but either they willfully refused to learn any tricks or I didn't know how to teach them. (But they displayed intelligence all over the place in various annoying, manipulative ways. Like selective deafness.)


Different dogs have different skills. My Min Pin will relentlessly (and I mean for hours) dig into a rabbit hole once she gets the scent. My Briard (a sheepdog) will herd anything that tries to leave the yard or house (meaning the cat, the min pin, the kids). She will even push the min pin away from the cat if they start to fight. It's the herding and protecting the hen house instinct. You should get one. Tell me where to send it.
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