Being a Pragmatist - Pros / Cons

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Being a Pragmatist - Pros / Cons
Hypothesis
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Posted Jan 6, 2008 - 10:07 AM:
Subject: Being a Pragmatist - Pros / Cons
The idea of pragmatism has always interested me even though I tend to procrastinate sometimes too. The great thing about pragmatism is that it brings about results. Of course you can argue about the morals of pragmatism as well, such as pragmatism might be bad even though the intentions are good. (only if we believe that "the road to hell is paved with good intentions")

Anyone here got any thoughts on this.



p.s. Pragmatism helps me to get girls...oh im such a sinner.
Drizzt Do'Urden
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Posted Jan 6, 2008 - 4:41 PM:

Just what is it you think pragmatism is?
Hypothesis
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Posted Jan 7, 2008 - 9:03 AM:

Looks like my OP was in-vain. Even my description of the thread seems to have gone unnoticed "No, You". Perhaps you should read the quote you have in your signature, perhaps you'll understand but thats hoping too much in an optimistic way.
Fido
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Posted Jan 12, 2008 - 6:47 PM:

Drizzt Do'Urden wrote:
Just what is it you think pragmatism is?

I think pragmatism is no ism at all. If you are pragmatic it is like being optimistic, and not is what you believe, but what you are. If you are optimistic, and realistic; then in any situation, you try to make the best of it, and try to determine the best course before taking any course. No one has the ideal life, and no one has the hypothetical life. In the real life, problems always present themselves out of solutions, and by way of problem solving, pragmatists seek a better solution, but ultimately, a solution rather than waiting for an ideal solution as an excuse for doing nothing.
Sullivan
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Posted Jan 12, 2008 - 6:56 PM:

I did a half-assed essay (for a half assed class, "Kinesiology" of all classes) on Pragmatism. It's one of the most practical philosophies as far as its application goes, but it makes assertions that are wishy-washy.

William James said that "prayer works ... when it works." (or something to that effect, but I believe I'm correct) That sets off an alarm in my head, but at the moment my concentration is dispersed like shrapnel from a grenade, so I can't put my thoughts together as to why that doesn't seem correct.

I have trouble arguing with William James. He's among my top five philosophers.
Calvino
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Posted Jan 13, 2008 - 2:03 PM:

Sullivan wrote:
William James said that "prayer works ... when it works." (or something to that effect, but I believe I'm correct) That sets off an alarm in my head, but at the moment my concentration is dispersed like shrapnel from a grenade, so I can't put my thoughts together as to why that doesn't seem correct.


Well, if it's interpreted head-on, it's a frickin' tautology, and then you can betcher ass it's true.

Since I doubt it's supposed to be interpreted head on: how about this: The quip is supposed to make us associate to two different senses of the word "works" with regards to prayers: the first being, that they actually do what they're "supposed" to do (bring about a supernaturally-mediated change of the world, or whatever), the second being, that they are in some sense "useful" to the praying individual. But now, we suddenly have, not a tautology, but a vague play on words which doesn't really tell us anything.

Of course, I have only your very fragmentary quote to work on, and I suppose the quoted remark makes more sense in its original context. sticking out tongue

-Calvino
Sullivan
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Posted Jan 13, 2008 - 5:19 PM:

I believe it's the former, but I wouldn't rule out the latter either.
Drizzt Do'Urden
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Posted Jan 14, 2008 - 9:31 AM:

hypothesis wrote:
Looks like my OP was in-vain. Even my description of the thread seems to have gone unnoticed "No, You". Perhaps you should read the quote you have in your signature, perhaps you'll understand but thats hoping too much in an optimistic way.


What I was asking for was a clarification of what it was you were talking about. Because nothing in your OP had anything to do with what I call pragmatism. Pragmatism in philosophy in generally referring to the school of epistemological (usually) thought, wherein the practical and theoretical collapse. For example, what is true and what is best for me to hold as true are not disctinct. This has been used in other fields of philosophy as well, but I believe Peirce and James were primarily concerned with epistemology. It is not simply the everyday character type of someone who is practical, or pragmatic.
Hypothesis
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Posted Jan 14, 2008 - 12:01 PM:

Drizzt Do'Urden wrote:

What I was asking for was a clarification of what it was you were talking about. Because nothing in your OP had anything to do with what I call pragmatism. Pragmatism in philosophy in generally referring to the school of epistemological (usually) thought, wherein the practical and theoretical collapse. For example, what is true and what is best for me to hold as true are not disctinct. This has been used in other fields of philosophy as well, but I believe Peirce and James were primarily concerned with epistemology. It is not simply the everyday character type of someone who is practical, or pragmatic.


I was hoping people would understand the definition of the word pragmatism in the context that I used it. It's easy to think that pragmatism is a branch of philosophy especially since it's being discussed in a philosophy forum, my bad.

What I really wanted to discuss is should we be Pragmatists (in Practical terms) or should we be Idle ?
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